2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online
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Product Description

The end-all-be-all guide to ramen as told by the iconoclastic New Yorker whose unlikely life story led him to open Tokyo’s top ramen shop—featuring 44 recipes!

“What Ivan Orkin does not know about noodles is not worth knowing.”—Anthony Bourdain

While scores of people line up outside American ramen powerhouses like Momofuku Noodle Bar, chefs and food writers in the know revere Ivan Orkin''s traditional Japanese take on ramen.  Ivan Ramen chronicles Orkin''s journey from dyed-in-the-wool New Yorker to the chef and owner of one of Japan''s most-loved ramen restaurants, Ivan Ramen. His passion for ramen is contagious, his story fascinating, and his recipes to-die-for, including the complete, detailed recipe for his signature Shio Ramen, master recipes for the fundamental types of ramen, and some of his most popular ramen variations.

Likely the only chef in the world with the knowledge and access to convey such a candid look at Japanese cuisine to a Western audience, Orkin is perfectly positioned to author what will be the ultimate English-language overview on ramen and all of its components. Ivan Ramen will inspire you to forge your own path, give you insight into Japanese culture, and leave you with a deep appreciation for what goes into a seemingly simple bowl of noodles.

Amazon.com Review

Featured Recipes from Ivan Ramen

 

From Booklist

This is an autobiography—and a cookbook, of sorts. More than that, it’s a journey of the making of an American ramen chef and an education into what constitutes a deceptively simple bowl of noodles in soup. Long Island–born Orkin traces his obsession with all things Japanese to his teens and college years, majoring in the language and its culture at the University of Colorado. After years of working unloved jobs and traveling to and from Asia, Orkin changed his life by attending the Culinary Institute of America and eventually secured stints at Lutèce and Restaurant Associates and opened a ramen shop in Tokyo. Thanks to his discovery by such celebrities as Ohsaki-San (Japan’s acknowledged ramen expert and manufacturer Sapporo Ichiban, among other good-luck encounters, Orkin established a following. Back in Manhattan, he now offers this book instructing readers in the ramen-making process: half-dozen-plus components fabricated from ingredients, all photographed and meticulously detailed in more than 30 recipes. Perhaps the tasks may be too complex, but by the end, all readers will gain an appreciation of the intricacies of ramen. --Barbara Jacobs

Review

"Ivan Ramen is a wonderful glimpse into the delicious, inspiring world of Ivan Orkin."
—Danny Bowien, James Beard Award–winning chef of Mission Chinese Food
 
"We are all fortunate that a young Ivan Orkin, growing up in 1970s suburban Long Island, fell in love with Japanese food. If he hadn’t, the world would never know Ivan’s amazing ramen, one of the most powerfully delicious noodle soups on the planet."
—Chad Robertson, James Beard Award–winning chef, author, and co-founder of Tartine Bakery and Bar Tartine
  
"Ivan has dedicated his whole life to understanding and creating the perfect bowl of ramen, and he has mastered the two most critical elements: the noodles and the broth. He consistently delivers the best bowls I’ve experienced in my life. Completely authentic, completely delicious." 
—Ming Tsai, James Beard Award–winning chef, author, and owner of Blue Ginger and Blue Dragon
 
“What Ivan Orkin does not know about noodles is not worth knowing.”  
—Anthony Bourdain chef, author, and host of Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown

About the Author

IVAN ORKIN is a native New Yorker. He spent a total of thirteen years in Japan, but now calls Dobbs Ferry, New York home. He lives there with his wife, Mari, and three sons, but returns to Tokyo frequently.

CHRIS YING, editor in chief and cofounder of Lucky Peach, is also the coauthor of Ivan Ramen and The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook. He lives in San Francisco with his wife.

NORIKO YAMAGUCHI is a Tokyo-based photographer specializing in food, travel, and still-life photography. Her work has appeared in Elle Japon and Bunshun, as well as in a variety of other Japanese publications.

DANIEL KRIEGER is a New York–based food and portrait photographer. His work has appeared in numerous publications, including the New York Times, Time Out New York, and Food & Wine.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Foreword 
  
Hey Ivan!
 
    First off, congratulations on—and thank you for—this book. Back when I was a twenty-nothing noodle-slurping lost sheep wandering from ramen shop to ramen shop, trying to decode the secrets of the soup, there was nothing like this in English, or maybe in any language. There is so much essential, indispensible information here for readers who want to learn something about ramen beyond the instructions on the side of the Styrofoam bowl. And then there’s your story, which is beyond remarkable: I couldn’t get a job in a decent shop when I was in Japan. You’ve broken through the ramen barrier in Tokyo, put your name on the map. Incredible. 
    And now you’re going to open a shop in New York! Well, let me be the first to congratulate you on a terrible decision. Here’s the best advice I can give you about trying it back home:
 
1. Do you know the classic 1992 Wesley Snipes–Woody Harrelson buddy basketball movie  White Men Can’t Jump? Of course you do! What you might not know is that your next year is going to be an infinite loop of a sad variation of that film:  White Men Can’t Eat Ramen.
    When you put a hot bowl of ramen in front of most Americans—white or otherwise—they will wait for it to cool down. It defeats the purpose, but they do not know this. It’s the equivalent of ordering a burger, and then when it comes, you don’t touch it! You wait for it to cool down, the lettuce to wilt, the cheese to congeal.
    Americans think it’s rude to slurp noodles. They have no concept that the noodles are continuing to cook in the soup. They have no concept that they should drink the soup first. And they will think the soup is too salty! They don’t understand that the soup is part of the noodles.
    I know this. I’ve seen thousands and thousands of bowls at Momofuku. People have been leaving behind noodles before it was cool to be gluten free. 
    These will be your customers!
 
2. Prepare to compromise.
     I’ve been to ramen shops in Tokyo. It’d be nice to serve sixty people a day in a twenty-seat restaurant, two bowls at a time. You won’t be able to do it like that here. The economics of New York are different.
     While you can sell ramen relatively expensively in Japan, you can’t do it in America. People will unblinkingly pay $20 a plate for spaghetti pomodoro—which is just canned tomatoes and boxed pasta—but they will bitch to the high heavens about forking over $20 for a bowl of soup that requires three or four or five different cooked and composed components to put together. Plus, you will rake yourself over the coals looking for ingredients that even approximate what you can buy down the alley from your shop in Tokyo.
     You’ll have to find a way to make food faster, and that means doing some things that may be sacrilegious in Japan. You’ve gotta make the compromise between having the soup hot, but not so hot that people can’t eat it. If you serve dishes with ramen, it’s going to slow the experience down. People will have a conversation instead of eating. That’s the main difference. In Tokyo, if you go to a really good ramen-ya, you hear nothing but slurping. In New York, people want to chat over their soup! It is unthinkable to those of us who have prayed at the altars of the ramen gods, but it is a reality you must confront.
 
3. Get ready for the most ridiculous complaints ever known to mankind.
     You should shave your head now so that you have no hair to pull out when the Internet gets revving on you.
     Get ready for criticism from the whole Asian demographic. Half the food bloggers in the world are Asian women. You’re going to be their bread and butter. They’re going to laugh at you and yell at you. They will be upset that your food isn’t “authentic” or that it’s not Japanese enough.
    White people will say, “I’ve lived in Japan, and this isn’t authentic.” You’re never going to have seen so many people express their feelings. Everybody is going to have their opinion on what Japan is. They may not have been to Japan, but you know what? They might have dated somebody from Japan.
   People are going to look at you like this weird thing, like the Eminem of ramen. I can almost get away with doing ramen because I’m Asian. You’re probably fucked.
    Fifty percent of people will be cheering for you, and the other 50 percent will want you dead. Get ready to accept that people hate you and want nothing but your demise. Use it as fuel. 
 
4. It’s like in Band of Brothers when the guy says, “The only hope you have is to accept the fact that you’re already dead.”
    When I opened up, people in New York didn’t know anything about ramen at all. The funny thing is, people know even less about ramen today. New York is so far behind the world of contemporary ramen in Japan—a world I can’t quite fathom how you conquered or why you’re leaving.
    What I originally loved about ramen shops in Japan was that it was a whole fascinating world. I can eat something really delicious for ten or fifteen bucks. It’s exactly like going to In-N-Out and knowing the secret menu. Once you’re in the know, everything’s good. You know what to order. 
    What drew me to cooking ramen was—and I hate to use this term— the punk aesthetic. It was a contrarian stance. You take something deemed by the world as junk food and pour passion into it, and make it the most delicious food possible. In that conflict is what I love about ramen. At the end of the day, it’s just soup and noodles. It’s one of the simplest forms of food, but also the most beloved. And of course you know that. You’re making Jewish comfort food through a Japanese lens.
    And down there on the Lower East Side, where Jewish chicken soup has roots more than a century old, you will slowly build an audience that understands your soup.
 
Americans will fail you more times than you can anticipate, but if you’re smart and steeled and shrewd—or maybe just incredibly fucking lucky—you will get what you’re looking for: your customers.
    There will be babies born and nourished on your food. One day they’ll be nine years old, and it’ll be really weird: they will have formed memories in your restaurant, on your ramen. They will learn to eat the way you want them to. You will learn from them.
    You’re feeding people, you’re going to bring people a lot of joy. It’s a heavy-duty thing when you get past all the bullshit. But do not underestimate the bullshit.
     Congratulations!
 
 —David Chang
 
PS: Once you open the restaurant, all of the emails you will ever get will look like this:  Can I have a reservation for 6 people at the ramen counter at 8:30 tonight? I know it’s Saturday and you just got reviewed but I’m coming in with this great group of . . .

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Yuki
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Professional chefs often require a reality check
Reviewed in the United States on February 25, 2020
My friend and I followed every recipe to the letter. Sadly, like many books written by professional chefs, Ivan''s recipes do not translate to reality for the home cook. The soup was bland...like serious garbage, perhaps due to the ingredients. Every ingredient we purchased... See more
My friend and I followed every recipe to the letter. Sadly, like many books written by professional chefs, Ivan''s recipes do not translate to reality for the home cook. The soup was bland...like serious garbage, perhaps due to the ingredients. Every ingredient we purchased was high quality, expensive, and organic. We''re also experienced foodies who spent a lot of time and effort on every detail. I was actually shocked while shopping for some of the ingredients because I could not believe the large quantities.
Some of the sides like the sofrito and bamboo would easily feed 100 people while others would just make barely enough for 4.
Professional Cooks shouldn''t be allowed to write a cookbook for the common household without severe editing or reflection.
33 people found this helpful
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someguyinatlanta
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A single star for the single ramen recipe
Reviewed in the United States on June 10, 2020
I get that this man is monomaniacally obsessed with ramen. However, there’s ONLY ONE ramen recipe in this disjointed, narcissistic nightmare of a book. I have given it a star for its single recipe (plus a myriad of ways to use leftovers). Let me reiterate: there is ONLY ONE... See more
I get that this man is monomaniacally obsessed with ramen. However, there’s ONLY ONE ramen recipe in this disjointed, narcissistic nightmare of a book. I have given it a star for its single recipe (plus a myriad of ways to use leftovers). Let me reiterate: there is ONLY ONE ramen recipe in this entire book.
13 people found this helpful
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Jennifer Cathey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Spirit of generosity in the many ramen recipes!!
Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2017
First off, I have to address that several people who reviewed the book say there is only one ramen recipe. Actually, in the "Variations on a Noodle" chapter there are 8 additional full ramen recipes. Most of them incorporate components from the shio ramen recipe.... See more
First off, I have to address that several people who reviewed the book say there is only one ramen recipe. Actually, in the "Variations on a Noodle" chapter there are 8 additional full ramen recipes. Most of them incorporate components from the shio ramen recipe. Ivan also includes recipe components that create completely different kinds of bowls of ramen including tsukemen ramen, mazemen ramen, dashi ramen, variations of shoyu ramen, summer special mazemen ramen, and even fat rye noodles for the ramen!! If you make the shio ramen, you are halfway to many more fantastic bowls of ramen!!!

Ivan does not pretend that this isn''t a memoir! On the back of the book it says it''s a memoir and a cookbook! It''s two books in one!

I live in Southern Oregon which isn''t exactly a hotspot for ramen shops. I would have to either travel to New York or Japan to get Ivan''s ramen!! But instead, in an incredible spirit of generosity, Ivan shares his exact recipes with us! Now I truly can make his ramen at home and I will be as soon as I can track down all the ingredients! :)
23 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Be prepared to make your own noodles
Reviewed in the United States on November 1, 2019
Book is over-rated. Although the authors life might be interesting one key chef step is fresh rye Raman noodles.
That is a deal killer in terms of getting to a finished product in a home kitchen.
11 people found this helpful
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Michael Kohlman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enjoyable recipes, enjoyable story.
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2017
One type of cookbook I enjoy is the bible, ie. Pizza Bible, Sauce Bible, but this isn''t one of them. To keep this comparison alive I would have to refer to it as one of the books of the bible, and consider this the, "Genesis," of Ramen. While the recipes... See more
One type of cookbook I enjoy is the bible, ie. Pizza Bible, Sauce Bible, but this isn''t one of them. To keep this comparison alive I would have to refer to it as one of the books of the bible, and consider this the, "Genesis," of Ramen.

While the recipes portion of the book is centered around one type of Ramen, Shio Ramen, the recipes are presented in great detail from individual elements to overall treatments and presentation. The surprise is the recipes and instructions contains a lot of detail that makes his Ramen famous. In addition, he also includes other recipes that utilize the elements used for making Ramen.

The first part of the book are memoirs that bring together the elements of his life that created the Ramen and his desire to go into the Ramen business. Experiences, thoughts, theories, and philosophies that ultimately leads into both very good recipes and successful businesses. But it is far more as he describes the culture and history of Ramen, personalities that contributed to its popularity, and even left room for future evolution of Ramen. He also compares it to other specific styles of Japanese cooking.

With his story, are other considerations such as considering food, considering going into business, creating the business as well not getting lost in a business. To me it was a lot more enjoyable to read his story, as it is presented in both observational wit, and detailed enough that he even provides how set backs can affect everything, such as a sudden loss, or loss of an agreement. Also how to overcome them.
15 people found this helpful
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megan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful Book, NOT Veggie Friendly
Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2020
This book is wonderful and I was very excited to read it. It arrived in excellent condition. The images are crisp and beautiful, and the recipe descriptions are thorough. However, I cannot eat anything from this book. I debated on keeping it because of how great it is, but... See more
This book is wonderful and I was very excited to read it. It arrived in excellent condition. The images are crisp and beautiful, and the recipe descriptions are thorough. However, I cannot eat anything from this book. I debated on keeping it because of how great it is, but I decided to return it. Everything is either chicken, pork, or beef, there aren''t any vegetarian or even pescatarian friendly recipes. I know you can substitute ingredients, but I am a newbie cook and would feel more confident in a cookbook that had solid vegetarian or pescatarian friendly recipes already incorporated into it. Again, it''s a great book, just not useful to me.
3 people found this helpful
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Nightfall
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting autobiography about an interesting man
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2019
I only knew of Ivan Orkin from Chef’s Table and cooking with David Chang, but he struck me as quite a character, a bit of an obsessed mad scientist, but one that experimented solely with ramen. This book is 80% autobiography and 20% cookbook, but the balance was fine for... See more
I only knew of Ivan Orkin from Chef’s Table and cooking with David Chang, but he struck me as quite a character, a bit of an obsessed mad scientist, but one that experimented solely with ramen. This book is 80% autobiography and 20% cookbook, but the balance was fine for me. I will never make his ramen recipe exactly the way he does, because I’m not crazy, but that doesn’t mean I’m not thrilled to know the real secrets to this type of ramen he makes. In addition, I can modify his recipes and come up with something my family will enjoy that won’t take three days or more to prepare. I enjoyed this glimpse into Orkin’s life, and I have his new cookbook to explore recipes beyond one bowl of ramen.
One person found this helpful
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Ken
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Kodawari
Reviewed in the United States on July 23, 2017
Locally sourced ingredients, emphasis on quality, flavor-fulness and joy made this man''s restaurants a success. Artisinal'' foods from a ramen angle is what made this an exceptional read; most unusually the author shares his proprietary recipes to illustrate the simplicity... See more
Locally sourced ingredients, emphasis on quality, flavor-fulness and joy made this man''s restaurants a success. Artisinal'' foods from a ramen angle is what made this an exceptional read; most unusually the author shares his proprietary recipes to illustrate the simplicity and exhaustive processes behind his brilliance. Plus I enjoyed him on ''Mind of a chef''. This is his story.
5 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Miguel
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It DOES have recipes! An amazing book!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 28, 2019
The reviews claming there are no recipes are not fair. They are mad because making ramen is tricky and the recipes of this book are real (days of work for a ramen bowl). It has some other nice and easier recipes and it is overall a really interesting reads. You will need...See more
The reviews claming there are no recipes are not fair. They are mad because making ramen is tricky and the recipes of this book are real (days of work for a ramen bowl). It has some other nice and easier recipes and it is overall a really interesting reads. You will need patience to cook like Ivan, but you have all the info you need and alternatives suggested for the ingredients hard to get. The view into Ivan’s story and creative process is super interesting. Happy with this purchase :)
7 people found this helpful
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Rosie Martin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect book for true ramen lovers
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 8, 2019
My boyfriend love this, it was his Christmas present. The book is a fantastic biography as well as technical information on making the perfect ramen. Less a recipe book and more of an instruction manual but for a dish as technically detailed as ramen this is perfect.
One person found this helpful
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Susaq
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not for beginners
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 10, 2020
I researched the best ramen recipe book to buy and decided on this one but it’s a little high-end for our taste and we have struggled to find the ingredients used. Definitely for serious ramen makers!
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Louise Baillie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good ramen cookbook
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 31, 2018
Lovely looking book. My boyfriend wanted a ramen cookbook so I bought this for him. I haven’t tried any of the recipes myself though.
One person found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I have better recipe books on Ramen
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 19, 2019
Not a recipe book, it is a book about him , with a few recipes.
3 people found this helpful
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2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online

2021 new arrival Ivan Ramen: new arrival Love, online Obsession, and Recipes from Tokyo's Most Unlikely Noodle Joint online